Ajax Loader Conjunction For Competitive Exams | Grammar Basics

In this article you will learn:

  • Conjunctions
  • Coordinating Conjunctions
  • Correlative Conjunctions
  • Subordinating Conjunctions
  • Conjunction for Competitive Exams

Exam Connect:

Conjunction for Competitive Exams is one of the most important parts of the verbal ability section of English for Entrance Exams. Usually, a candidate gets a sentence where he/ she has to fill in the appropriate conjunction or choose what type is given conjunction. Conjunctions for exams appear in the forms of:    

  • Fill in the blanks
  • Choose the right Option
Conjunction For Competitive Exams

Conjunctions

A Conjunction is a “joining word”. It helps in understanding the logical connection between two words or phrases. Consider the following sentences:

  • Mina and Riya are friends. (The conjunction and joins the words Mina and Riya)
  • I would like to go to the movies, but I am busy. (The conjunction but joins the sentences “I would like to go” and “I am busy”).

Conjunction for Competitive Exams consists of questions based on the different aspects of this part of speech.

Types of Conjunctions

Coordinating Conjunctions

This type of Conjunction for Competitive Exams is used to join words, phrases, and clauses of equal grammatical rank in a sentence. Examples of such Conjunctions are for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so, etc. A comma is used where coordinating conjunctions are used. A few examples are given below:

  • Did she come by train, or by bus?
  • Renu and Priya are going to the party tonight.
 Correlative Conjunctions

This type of Conjunction for Competitive Exams is a pair of conjunctions that work together in a sentence. Examples of such Conjunctions are either/ or, neither/ nor, not only/ but also, etc. A few examples are given below:

  • We had neither umbrellas nor raincoats when it began to rain.
  • It is either me or Sam who always cooks.
Subordinating Conjunctions

This type of Conjunction for Competitive Exams is used to join independent and dependent clauses of a sentence. Examples of such Conjunctions are because, since, as, although, though, while, and whereas, etc. Sometimes, adverbs such as until, after, or before, etc. function as this form of conjunction. A few examples are given below:

  • I will stay here until he calls me.
  • I drank your juice because I was very thirsty.
Conjunction For Competitive Exams

Conjunction for Competitive Exams Questions for Practice

Fill in the blanks with the suitable Conjunction:

1. She doesn’t eat outside _______ she likes homemade food.

  1. because
  2. but
  3. or
  4. None of the Above

Answer: A

Explanation: The Conjunction used here is a subordinating conjunction. 

2. _______ Raju _____ Shyam knew where the car was.

  1. either/ or
  2. neither/ nor
  3. Both A & B
  4. None of the Above

Answer: B

Explanation:  The Conjunction for Competitive Exams used here is correlative conjunction. 

3. I will go ____ bring the keys.

  1. because
  2. for
  3. and
  4. None of the Above

Answer: C

Explanation:  The Conjunctionused here is a coordinating conjunction. 

4. We listened carefully ____ she was about to disclose the exam results.

  1. for
  2. and
  3. but
  4. None of the Above

Answer: A

Explanation:  The Conjunction for Competitive Exams used here is a coordinating conjunction. 

5. He preferred _______ me ____ to do the shopping.

  1. either/ or
  2. neither/ nor
  3. Both A & B
  4. None of the Above

Answer: A

Explanation: The Conjunction used here is correlative conjunction. 

Conjunction For Competitive Exams

English for Entrance Exams is generally an easy section for any entrance examinations, but the grammar part of it has always confused exam takers. Questions of the section conduct tests about the in-depth knowledge of a student in using the English Language. Hope this article was helpful to you in understanding the part of Conjunction for Competitive Exams. All the best!

More Articles on Verbal Ability:


1.5 2 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments